Armoury

Weapons

This is a general overview of the weapons used in Fencing. For details on the parts of the weapons, please see the Glossary section.

Foil

Foil is the most common of the three weapons, usually the starting point of a Fencers career. It originated as the training weapon for the rapier in the middle ages. Foil teaches a Fencer how to attack with the point and priority. The weapon itself is the most flexible of the three, and lightest at 500g (with the Sabre). Foils come in two different grips, either orthopedic grip (pistol grip), or French grip (post grip) and has a small guard to cover the fingers. Electric foils have a body wire socket (either bayonet or two-pin), connected to a wire that runs down the length of the blade. At the action end of the weapon is a button. When the button is pushed in, the scoring apparatus signals that a hit has been made.

Epee

Epee developed from the rapier. Epee teaches a Fencer how to attack with the point accurately. The weapon itself is the stiffest of the three, and heaviest at 750g. Epees come in two different grips, either orthopedic grip (pistol grip), or French grip (post grip) and has a large guard, covering the hand. Electric epees have a body wire socket (three-pin), connected to two wires that run down the length of the blade. The third part of the socket is used to earth the gard. This is used to stop his on the guard from being registered. At the action end of the weapon is a button. When the button is pushed in, the scoring apparatus signals that a hit has been made.

Sabre

Sabre is the "pirate" weapon, originating from the straight sabres used in the military. Sabre teaches a Fencer how to attack with the edge of the blade and the point. The weapon itself is the lightest at 500g (with the foil). The guard is the largest of the three, due to the weapon being used in the vertical and horizontal planes, covering the hand and fingers. Electric sabres have a body wire socket (either bayonet or two-pin), connected to the guard and blade. When the blade comes into contact with the opponents lame, the current in the blade is earthed sending a signal to the scoring apparatus.